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Newsletter #4 - 8/3/2001

You are receiving this newsletter if you have previously ordered products from eLearnAid or have asked to be on our mailing list. Instructions to unsubscribe from this newsletter are at the bottom of this email.




In this newsletter:
  1. Win an Oxford English Dictionary Word-A-Day 2002 Calendar
  2. Word of the Day: CALENDAR
  3. Vocabularies, Literacy and Success
  4. One of our most popular products: Collins Cobuild 3rd Edition
  5. Group licenses available for Collins Cobuild CD-ROM
  6. Free shipping to continental USA for 20-volume Oxford English Dict.
  7. New products added since our last newsletter
  8. Write to us
  9. Tech tips: Dictionaries that can be manually installed to disk
  10. Tech tips: Character display problems with your Collins dictionary?
  11. Survey
  12. Subscribe/unsubscribe





1. WIN AN OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY WORD-A-DAY 2002 CALENDAR!

If you are a current or past customer (which you probably are if you’re getting this newsletter) you can win a free OED Word-A-Day 2002 Calendar for referring to us a new customer who purchases an Oxford English Dictionary, either the CD-ROM or the 20-volume set. For more details,
click here.




2. WORD OF THE DAY

Calendar, noun.

1. The system according to which the beginning and length of successive civil years, and the subdivision of the year into its parts, is fixed; as the Babylonian, Jewish, Roman, or Arabic calendar.

Julian Calendar, that introduced by Julius Caesar b.c. 46, in which the ordinary year has 365 days, and every fourth year is a leap year of 366 days, the months having the names, order, and length still retained.

Gregorian Calendar, the modification of the preceding adapted to bring it into closer conformity with astronomical data and the natural course of the seasons, and to rectify the error already contracted by its use, introduced by Pope Gregory XIII in a.d. 1582, and adopted in Great Britain in 1752.

2. A table showing the division of a given year into its months and days, and referring the days of each month to the days of the week; often also including important astronomical data, and indicating ecclesiastical or other festivals, and other events belonging to individual days. Sometimes containing only facts and dates belonging to a particular profession or pursuit, as Gardener's Calendar, Racing Calendar, etc. Also a series of tables, giving these facts more fully; an almanac.

b. A contrivance for reckoning days, months, etc.

This word comes from the
Oxford English Dictionary on CD-ROM.




3. VOCABULARIES, LITERACY AND SUCCESS

You’ve heard it all before... if you could just learn one new word a day, you would enhance your life and great things will come to you.

Truth or lie?

Certainly the more literate you are, the more doors are open to you. If you look at your world around you, you’ll find that in general people of success are more literate than those who are not, and people in despair often are semi-literate or even illiterate.

What does this mean to you?

Whenever you encounter a word you do not understand, you should check in a dictionary what it really means. I remember in school being taught to “figure it out by looking at the context of a word”. After many years using this method, I can assure you that THAT was a lie and is NOT workable.

The only real method of figuring out what a word means IS to consult the dictionary.

I once “figured out” the meaning of the word “plagiarize”. Unfortunately, I got my meaning from a comedic song by Thomas Lehrer. In the song and using the context, this word meant “to study”. Imagine my confusion in my first week of university when we were being told we should never “plagiarize”. Oh my! It took several people telling me why this rule was okay before I figured out that I had a wrong meaning for “plagiarize”! If only I had looked up the word in a dictionary when I first encountered it.

I hear it all the time from others. No, THEY don’t have to look up words in a dictionary because they were taught how to figure it out for themselves. Nonsense! They were taught wrong. And if you want to limp along inventing meanings for words, do what they do and what I used to do -- figure it out from the context.

Look it up in the dictionary. The purpose of a dictionary is to state the meaning of the word. Why bypass a dictionary? Only if you want to remain semi-literate.

Do yourself a favor. Get yourself a good dictionary (or several) and look up those words you don’t understand.

Now THAT is a key to success!

-- Ruth




4. ONE OF OUR MOST POPULAR PRODUCTS

Collins Cobuild Third Edition (CD-ROM, hardcover, or softcover)

This CD has the text of the Third Edition of the paper dictionary. This includes 2,000 new words that have come into use, more examples, improved coverage of American English, and updated definitions to make them simpler and provide a clearer understanding.

The First Edition CD contained the Collins COBUILD English Language Dictionary, Collins COBUILD English Usage and Collins COBUILD English Grammar, with 5 million additional words of usage examples. However, it did not pronounce the words.

The Second Edition was called the “edict” and it just contained the dictionary. But it also pronounced the words and their inflected forms.

The Third Edition on CD has 2,000 more pronunciations with all of the features of the First Edition. It also installs to disk and the prices have been reduced.

Collins Cobuild hardcover or softcover
Collins Cobuild on CD-ROM




5. GROUP LICENSES AVAILABLE FOR COLLINS DICTIONARIES ON CD-ROM

Would you like everyone in your group to be able to use one of the Collins dictionaries you use?

Site licenses are available for the following CD dictionaries:

Collins Cobuild Third Edition

Collins Cobuild English Collocations

Collins Robert French-English, English-French Dictionary

Collins English Dictionary

Contact us for pricing information for group licenses by emailing us at sales@elearnaid.com.




6. FREE SHIPPING TO CONTINENTAL USA FOR 20-VOLUME OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY

The
twenty-volume Oxford English Dictionary set is now being sold with free shipping to locations in the continental USA. You get all 20 volumes shipped to your door for only $900.00. That is only $45.00 per volume.

International shipments: We may be able to ship to international locations for as little as $50.00 in shipping charges. Contact us for more information and a quote on your shipping charges. Email us!






7. NEW PRODUCTS SINCE LAST NEWSLETTER

We’ve been very busy adding titles we think you might be interested in. Here are some that we’ve added...

Management Series (Hardcover plus CD-ROM)

Small Common Words Defined (Hardcover)

The New Grammar (Hardcover)

When the Thrill is Gone (Softcover & eBook coming soon)

Nature's Best Herbal Remedies (Softcover)

Oxford American Dictionary (Softcover)

Collins Talking Dictionary by Intense Language, German-English (CD)

Collins Electronic English Dictionary & Thesaurus (CD)

MacMillan Dictionaries for Students and for Children (Hardcover)

Webster’s New World Children’s Dictionary (Hardcover)

Webster’s New World Students Dictionary (Hardcover)

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (CD)

Glossary of Basic Math Terms & Symbols (Softcover)

Basic Geography Glossary (Softcover)

Hard-to-Find Words Dictionary (Softcover)

NTC's American Idioms Dictionary (Softcover)

NTC's Dictionary of American Slang & Colloquial Expressions (Hardcover)




8. WRITE TO US

You can always write to us. The We likes to hear from you. Your views, ideas and even any difficulty you may have are of concern to her. She will help you with any matter you care to write to her about.

We would especially like to hear from your comments on any of the newer products. We regularly update our website and if you have helpful hints you would like to pass on to other users, they will probably get published as well as your review.

Write to:
Bernie Littman, eLearnAid
P O Box 921585, Sylmar CA 91392-1585 USA





9. TECH TIPS: DICTIONARIES THAT CAN BE MANUALLY INSTALLED TO DISK

Much of the value of having a dictionary on your computer is being able to look up a word in just seconds. If you have to insert the right CD in the drive, part of that appeal is gone. Here are instructions to manually install the data files for the following dictionaries:

Shorter Oxford English Dictionary

Collins dictionaries by Intense

Collins Cobuild First Edition, the edict and the Collocations




10. TECH TIPS: CHARACTER DISPLAY PROBLEMS WITH YOUR COLLINS DICTIONARY?

If you are having problems with characters displaying strangely,
click here.




11. SURVEY

Did you find our order process easy to use? If so, what did you like about it? If not, what did you not like about it? What would you do differently?

Please email your responses to us:
info2@elearnaid.com




12. SUBSCRIBE/UNSUBSCRIBE

You are receiving this newsletter if you have previously ordered products from eLearnAid or have asked to be on our mailing list. To unsubscribe from this newsletter, please email us at
newsletter@elearnaid.com and put "unsubscribe" in the subject line.




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